Thursday, November 12, 2009

SSH on a ReadyNAS NV+

Running SSH was a step along the way of me becoming more familiar with SSH and running a remote git repository on my ReadyNAS NV+. Note that there are security concerns with opening SSH on your ReadyNAS device and exposing password authentication. It would be fairly trivial to launch a password attach over the SSH connection.

SSH defaults to use passwords for authentication. The password is set to your ReadyNAS admin password at the time you install SSH on your ReadyNAS. If this password is to be saved on disk somewhere, for example as part of an SSH configuration on the machine from which you are contacting the ReadyNAS, you may choose to temporarily change your ReadyNAS admin password before installing SSH, and then change the ReadyNAS admin password back afterwards. If you ever need to change the SSH password on the ReadyNAS, just reinstall SSH from System > Update in the ReadyNAS admin browser application.

  1. Get the SSH bin file from the ReadyNAS web site. Click the Add-ons for RAIDiator 4.1.3+ link and scroll to the EnableRootSSH link. Download the bin file and store it on your local computer.

  2. Log in as admin on your ReadyNAS using a browser

  3. Update your ReadyNAS firmware (optional). This is under System > Update. Just click the Check for Updates button.

  4. Click the Local tab and click Choose File to find the EnableRootSSH.bin file that you previously downloaded. Upload this and follow the prompts.


After a reboot SSH will be installed and ready to use. To login execute the following:

# Use the hostname or IP address of the ReadyNAS
$ ssh root@readynas-hostname


Then type the ReadyNAS admin password that existed at the time SSH was installed.

On my ReadyNAS, my share volumes are under /c and user volumes are under /c/home.

$ cd /c; ls -1

SSH can be configured to use public private keys as well. Refer to my later post and OpenSSH Public Key Authentication for more details.

Security Alert: Opening up your NAS to SSH with password authentication on a public network is a bad idea. In my situation I'm behind a firewall and simply using SSH for the convenience and to play around with the protocol.

1 comment:

bnmand said...

You can use the passwd command to change your SSH password. Simply login to SSH and then type passwd

You will be prompted for a new password, enter it and then press enter. You will be prompted to enter it again and then you should press enter again.